Thursday 11th February 1993 Lunchtime 12:30

1 and 2 and 3 and 4 . . 1 and 2 and 3 and 4 . . 1 and 2 and 3 and 4 . . 1 and 2 and 3 and 4 . . 1 and . .
Breathe . . . . Breathe . . . .
1 and 2 and 3 and 4 . . 1 and 2 and 3 and 4 . . 1 and 2 and 3 and 4 . . 1 and 2 and 3 and 4 . . 1 and . .
Breathe . . Breathe . . . .
1 and 2 and 3 and 4 . . 1 and 2 and 3 and 4 . . 1 and 2 and 3 and 4 . . 1 and 2 and 3 and 4 . . 1 and . .
Breathe . . . . Breathe . . . .
1 and 2 and 3 and 4 . . 1 and 2 and 3 and 4 . . 1 and 2 and 3 and 4 . . 1 and 2 and 3 and 4 . . 1 and . .
Breathe . . . . Breathe . . . .
Come on, Desmond! Keep up!
My Dad already looked exhausted.
1 and 2 and 3 and 4 . . 1 and 2 and 3 and 4 . . 1 and 2 and 3 and 4 . . 1 and 2 and 3 and 4 . . 1 and . .
Breathe . . . . Breathe . . . .

Dr Lewis always insists on using a metronome for our practice CPR training.

My Dad has no sense of rhythm which may explain his success rate.

Note: This post has been updated in accordance with the current UK Resuscitation Council guidance. In fact, Dr Lewis was actually part of the original 30:2 campaign.

Dr Lewis’ cardiopulmonary resuscitation training.